06.08.2021 | History

3 edition of A hunger for aesthetics found in the catalog.

A hunger for aesthetics

enacting the demands of art

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Published by Administrator in Columbia University Press

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  • United States
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    • Columbia University Press


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      • Includes bibliographical references and index.

        StatementColumbia University Press
        PublishersColumbia University Press
        Classifications
        LC Classifications2012
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 55 p. :
        Number of Pages48
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 10nodata
        Series
        1
        2Columbia themes in philosophy, social criticism, and the arts
        3
        Introduction : the Dewey effect The Pop effect The Sontag effect The Richter effect The Salcedo effect.

        nodata File Size: 5MB.


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Throughout A Hunger for Aesthetics, he reveals the place of critique in contemporary art, which, if we understand aesthetics as critique, confirms that it is integral to art. Focusing first on Richter's Baader-Meinhof series, Kelly concludes with Salcedo's enactments of suffering caused by social injustice.

A Hunger for Aesthetics

The Afro-Indian gods will negate the colonizing mysticism of Catholicism, which is the sorcery of repression and the moral redemption of the rich. Literature and Aesthetics About the Author.

Such was the gallery of famished people that identified Cinema Novo with a miserabilism condemned by the government, by a critique that serves antinationalist interests, by the producers and by the public—the latter being incapable of facing the images of poverty.

In fact, the thematic core of this book appears to emerge directly out of his contentious response to the anti-aesthetic stance, as he refers to it. Revolutionary art should be a powerful enough magic to enchant man beyond the point where he can no longer keep on living under this absurd reality. However, his specific approach to the works is for the most part not critical, relying instead on factual descriptions that are historically interesting but do not add much to his argument.

Throughout A Hunger for Aesthetics, he reveals the A hunger for aesthetics of critique in contemporary art, which, if we understand aesthetics as critique, confirms that it is integral to art. As if, above all, in this apparatus of tropical landscapes, the mental indigence of the filmmakers behind these films could ever be disguised. In developing theoretical resources to renew the relations between aesthetics and ethics, social theory, and political economy, it will command the close attention of curators, historians, sociologists, and practitioners of the arts, especially those who have been tempted to abandon aesthetics.

The point is not to define the aesthetic in analytically precise terms, but to forge a middle path between absolute aesthetic autonomy and the reactionary dismissal of the aesthetic altogether. The revolution is an anti-reason that communicates the tensions and the rebellions of the most irrational of all phenomena, which is poverty.

Cinema Novo is an ongoing, self-explanatory process that is helping us to see reality clearer, freeing us from the debilitating delirium of hunger. But from this anti aesthetic standpoint, Kelly argues, she goes on to acknowledge that the same distancing mechanism that threatens to desensitize the viewer can also, by way of aesthetic semblance, render the image more accessible, thus creating a space for compassionate reflection. Cinema Novo teaches us that an aesthetics of violence, before being primitive, is revolutionary.